A Monadnock Community Survey about Public Health's Connection to Art

“Arts and Loneliness” survey available

 

Arts Alive! is partnering with Antioch University New England to examine the Monadnock Region’s participation levels in the arts, the common barriers to participation, and how participation and arts engagement impacts loneliness and connection.

“We’re hoping this data will give the community another strong, research-supported reason to invest in the arts,” says Jessica Gelter, executive director of Arts Alive!

Well-being and community connection are keystones of many arts organizations’ missions in the Monadnock Region, and this study aims to collect tangible behavioral data and information that will support both arts engagement and arts-based community health interventions.

With the results Arts Alive! hopes to be able to give artists, arts organizations, and community groups information on what practices and engagement strategies work well to connect the community, and what the additional barriers might be for those who want to have the positive benefits of more arts and connectivity in their lives.

“The time feels ripe for this as we go into an uncertain winter – how will we emerge from the pandemic and reconnect with our communities?” Gelter says.

Arts Alive! will build an advocacy program, a professional development program, and a collaborative arts access program, with artist and arts organization partners as well as public health and community service partners, based on the results of this study. The survey is the first step in the process – the study will include other interactive elements, currently in the design process.

The goal of the organizing partners is to have 900 responses to the online survey by the end of February. Anyone who completes the survey can elect to be entered in a drawing for a $100 gas card or $100 grocery card. Find more information at monadnockartsalive.org/loneliness-survey

BMC presents the Northern Roots Traditional Music Festival

The Brattleboro Music Center presents:

Now a cornerstone of the traditional music calendar in New England, the Northern Roots Traditional Music Festival returns on Jan. 30-31, 2021, in virtual form!

This popular event will continue to offer a unique showcase of a variety of northern musical traditions including Irish, Scottish, English, French Canadian and Shetland. Featured performers Dylan  Foley (fiddle) (Pascal Gemme (fiddle), Nicholas Williams (flute, piano, accordion), Kevin Henderson (fiddle), and members of the Gawler Family Band (singers) will be offering workshops as well as performing in the annual concert.

The festival begins Saturday, Jan. 30, at 11 am with a series of five hour-long workshops (instrumental and vocal).  We will wrap up the day with an evening virtual concert.  For those of you who miss the traditional Northern Roots Festival fare – we will provide recipes for some of your favorites, so you can replicate the full festival food experience!

On Sunday, Jan. 31, we will host three sessions in the afternoon for “all who will” – and while we will miss the ambiance of McNeill’s Brewery, we won’t have to worry about not having enough space!

Learn more about our performers here.

The schedule:

  • Saturday Workshops: (tentative order)
    • Shetland tunes with Kevin Henderson
    • Work songs with Bennett Kosesni
    • French Canadian tunes with Pascal Gemme
    • Swedish tunes with Nicholas Williams
    • Sligo tunes with Dylan Foley
  • Saturday evening concert
  • Sunday sessions
    • 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm  Gawler Family sing-along
    • 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm  French Canadian tunes with Pascal Gemme and Nicholas Williams
    • 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm  Irish Session with Benedict Gagliardi and Armand Aromin

All events are by donation.  Links to all events will be posted later at https://bmcvt.org/northern-roots-festival/

33rd RALPH PAGE 2021 – A VIRTUAL EVENT

NEW ENGLAND FOLK FESTIVAL’s
33rd RALPH PAGE 2021 – A VIRTUAL EVENT
Sunday afternoon, January 17th, 2021
@ 1:00 – 4:15 pm Eastern Standard Time (EST-USA)
Note: All times listed below are in EST time as above.
Registration:
 
DOORS OPEN ~ 12:45:
Sign in to zoom.us, chat with friends.
 
WELCOME ~ 1:00-1:05:
with Tod Whittemore and Marcie Van Cleave
 
CONCERT ~ 1:05-2:00:
MUSICAL TRADITIONS OF NEW ENGLAND
with Keith Murphy & Becky Tracy
 
CRACKLING CHESTNUTS ~ 2:05-2:30:
with David Smukler and David Millstone
 
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 2:35-3:25:
1. INTERNATIONAL DANCE with Marcie Van Cleave
2.”The View from the Fiddler’s Throne” with Randy Miller
3. MUSIC JAM with Keith Murphy and Becky Tracy
 
RETROSPECTIVE ~ 3:30-4:00:
“TED (SANNELLA) TALK” with David Millstone and David Smukler
 
DANCE ~ 4:05-4:15:
MONEY MUSK DANCE PARTY
Waltz
 
CONTRIBUTIONS:
If you will please, they are greatly appreciated! Go to:

Tony Barrand interviewed on MuseMentors Podcast

Seasonal Music and Story-Telling to Warm Your Heart

At this time when the darkness turns toward light, the podcast MuseMentors offer a very special seasonal episode featuring Tony Barrand who is sure to give you a new spin on the season.

Tony Barrand was born in England in 1945 but has lived most of his life in southern Vermont in the vibrant town of Brattleboro—a place that shines all the more brightly because of him. This Cornell PhD and Professor Emeritus of Boston University is not just an academic, but also a singer, dancer, and story-teller.

Tony Barrand offers stories of his mentors and mentees, as well as plenty of music and intriguing tales about seasonal carols. You’ll hear the best Christmas carols you’ve never heard of and will never forget. Guaranteed to brighten your days during this darkest time of year.

Listen for free with this link: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1278755/7001557-tony-barrand-sing-me-a-story-dance-me-a-song

Ted Sannella

New website about Ted Sannella

From Callers David Millstone and David Smukler:

In November of 2020, David Millstone and I sent out a call for stories about Ted Sannella to mark the 25th anniversary of his death on November 18. There was a terrific response, and we are proud to announce a new website, Sannella Stories, where these memories are shared. Nearly 70 people sent in their “Sannella Story.” These range from serious to silly and include brief acknowledgments and more extended entries.

In addition, we’ve assembled a collection of photographs, audio files, and videos. You’ll also find dances and tunes that were written for Ted, an index of all his dances, and links to other sites with information of interest.

Of course, it’s still possible to add to this collection; you’ll find that link on the site as well.

The two of us will be presenting a short “Ted Talk” as part of the virtual Ralph Page Dance Legacy Weekend, an event scheduled for Sunday afternoon, January 17. Details are still being arranged, but updated information will be available at the RPDLW site.

Our sincere thanks to the many people who contributed and in this way are helping to keep alive the memory of a major figure in the world of New England traditional dance.

David Smukler

Photo of Nelson Town Hall

A New Song to Sing about Dancing

Lynn Arnold has written a new song

Still We Will Dance

It starts out unexpectedly; the catching of an eye;
A simple question posed by one, the other’s quick reply.
You’ll never guess how much can change, from just that first glance—
A seed is planted with the words, “May I have this dance.”

CHORUS
The seasons turn, the years go by, and so we dance along;
Sometimes the rhythm’s hard to find, sometimes the beat is strong.
The steps may change, the tempo slow, by choice or by chance;
We may not know what lies ahead, but still we will dance.

In early days, it’s hard to know just where a dance might go.
Though tempted to rush through the steps, we keep the rhythm slow.
The future calls, we both agree that we’ll take the chance
And promise to be partners for a lifetime of dance.

A partnership must be a dance in order to succeed.
Sometimes I slip, you hold me up, sometimes I take the lead.
If, through whatever time we have that good fortune grants,
We move together, not against, we can’t help but dance.

A dance may be a waltz or jig, or something like a walk.
As we grow old, it may just be the times we sit and talk.
The dance evolves; it doesn’t mean the end of romance—
We carry on, in our own way, continue to dance.

Life has a rhythm all its own, in all the tunes it plays,
The opportunities to dance a constant through our days.
To live a life that satisfies, fulfills, and enchants,
Just listen for the music and remember to dance.

Words and music by Lynn Arnold © 2020

Still We Will Dance – Lyrics Only

Still We Will Dance, music with words and chords

Audio of the Melody, arranged by Carol Compton

Donations needed for Jeremiah and Annemieke McLane after a House Fire

Please consider helping Annemieke and Jeremiah McLane, two beloved musicians in Vermont.

As you may have heard, the McLane family – Annemieke, Jeremiah, and Luke – lost their home to fire in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Thankfully the family was not home and are all safe.

In the days ahead, there will likely be many ways to lend a hand, however, an immediate need will be money. The United Church of Strafford’s Deacons Fund and the McLane’s family and friends have come together to form the McLane Recovery Fund through Mascoma Bank. If you would like to contribute to this fund, please make checks payable to:

McLane Recovery Fund

And send to:

United Church of Strafford Deacons
PO Box 124
Strafford VT 05072

Photo of Nelson Town Hall

A Monday Night Dance – Recorded February 3, 2020

A recording from a Monday Night in Nelson, February 3, 2020

  1. Lady Walpole’s Reel, called by Rich Hart, played by Harvey Tolman, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  2. Money Musk, called by Don Primrose, played by Harvey Tolman, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  3. Dog Branch Reel, called by Rich Hart, played by Harvey Tolman, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  4. Chorus Jig, called by Chris Salmon, played by Roger Treat, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  5. Al’s Safeway Produce, called by Chris Salmon, played by Roger Treat, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  6. Simplicity Swing, called by Peter Kingsley, played by Roger Treat, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  7. Solstice Special, called by Peter Kingsley, played by Roger Treat, fiddle, and Lloyd Carr, piano
  8. Heartbeat Contra, called by Rich Hart, played by Nat Backes and Hilliare Wilder, harmonica
  9. Waltz, played by Nat Backes, Hilliare Wilder and Joe Sykes

New Edition of “A Time to Dance” book and DVDs

Looking for something to do during this time of no dancing? It’s a good time to read this great book, recently reissued.

New Edition of A Time to Dance: American Country Dancing from Hornpipes to Hot Hash by Richard Nevell; original edition 1977 St Martin’s Press, new edition 2017 Bauhan Publishing.

Plus two Films: Country Corners and Full of Life A-Dancin’ Produced By Richard Nevell and Robert Fiore, back in print on one DVD with an additional portrait of legendary tune writer and musician, the late Bob McQuillen.

“I love this book! In A Time to Dance I like that there are different styles of dancing in different parts of North America, be it Southern Appalachia, New Hampshire, Quebec, Cape Breton. Dancer Daron Douglas says “There is a certain amount of courting at these dances” That is important. The book is free of academics. In Country Corners, it is nice to see The Ed Larkin folks dancing Chorus Jig the old way without the hurried corner turning and frantic balance, and swinging when it’s not called for, in Full Of Life A-Dancin’ we see clogging you’ll never see in New England, a regional difference. -Dudley Laufman, Canterbury, NH

Two book reviews:

“The immense scope is handled with clarity and insight, fitting American country dancing into the broader context of American studies…Nevell records American country dances as historical artifacts, as social expressions of rural and urban communities, as manifestations of democracy, and as an evolving traditional art that changes to meet the needs of a changing American society. Valuable for students of dance history, American studies, cultural anthropology, liberal arts, and of interest to both academic and public libraries. From the Choice journal of the American Library Association.

“A splendid book, at once personable and probing, I predict will become a dance classic.”
Denver Post

For info about where to find the films and book please contact author / producer Richard Nevell at atimetodance2017@gmail.com