Mar 012015
 

Annalivia promo piano

Join us on Friday May 8 for the return of Liz Simmons, Flynn Cohen and Lissa Schneckenburger to the Nelson Town Hall for an 8:00 PM concert. Admission is $15/$12(seniors, students, or in advance)

LOW LILY, formerly called Annalivia, is an American ‘roots and branches’ string trio which draws from tradition and today to create their own brand of new acoustic folk music. The members – Liz Simmons, Flynn Cohen, and Lissa Schneckenburger – are masterful players and have long histories with traditional music, ranging from bluegrass to Irish, Scottish, New England and Old Time Appalachian music. This background, combined with each member’s stellar compositional skills and cutting edge arranging chops, makes for music which sounds rooted yet contemporary. Folk and string-band enthusiasts alike will be drawn in by the expert vocals and songwriting, excellent musicianship, and innovative approach. The members of Low Lily are seasoned musicians and have individually toured and performed with the likes of Ruth Moody, Cathie Ryan, John Whelan, Aoife Clancy, Adrienne Young, Childsplay and Solas, among others.


How Did You Hear About This Concert?
May We Add You To MFS Email List?


>

If you prefer to mail a check for advance reservations, make the check payable to Monadnock Folklore Society and mail (so we receive the check at least 1 week before the concert) to the address on our Contact Us page.

 Posted by on March 1, 2015 at 2:10 pm
Apr 142015
 

Bob McQuillen spoke at the Nelson Town Hall for a Nelson Library Summer Forum on July 14, 2011.

Our thanks to Rich Rommer for taking this video, to CJ Leake for additional audio, and to David Millstone for making it available on YouTube.

 

 

 Posted by on April 14, 2015 at 4:33 pm
Feb 082015
 

shortsister1

 

Fay Baird, Kate Seeger, and Kim Wallach…

have been singing and performing together since 1979. They return to the Nelson Town Hall on Sunday, March 15 for a 7:00 PM concert. Admission is $12/$9(Sr/Jr/Advance).

Though they are not really sisters, and not particularly short, they do sound like sisters and share a delight in harmony. The songs chosen by the trio tell stories and paint pictures, conveying strong visual images through music. They favor acapella arrangements but also accompany themselves with guitar, autoharp and banjo.

The Short Sisters challenge the audience’s imagination and invite their participation with compelling words, powerful melodies and elegant arrangements. Audiences comment on more than just the trio’s extraordinary harmonies and choice of material. Their playfulness and pleasure in each other’s company leave listeners energized and cheered. Their repertoire includes intricate rounds, songs from American, African-American and British traditions and material from contemporary songwriters. The Short Sisters’ favorite songs, funny or moving, thought-provoking or frivolous, traditional or newly written, convey optimism about tackling life’s challenges.

The trio’s performance list covers Folksong Societies and Coffeehouses in their home states of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Florida, forays to Michigan and California, and regular appearances in New Jersey, New England and Washington D.C. They have recorded five albums, four of which are available on CD.

Songs both traditional and new: unusual rounds, musical curiosities and chorus songs, Sacred Harp songs, ballads and much more. Whether acapella or with guitar, autoharp and banjo, the Short Sisters blend their voices in stunning and original harmonies.

 Posted by on February 8, 2015 at 1:50 pm
Feb 062015
 

The next sing will take place on Thursday, March 19, at 7 pm.  NO experience is necessary. If you think this sounds interesting, we’d love to have you come listen and give it a try.  We will have several extra books to lend for the session.  If you’ve sung shape-note songs in the past and are ready for more singing close to home, we’re eager to meet you and have you join us, too.  If you want directions, please email ecsandberg@gmail.com.

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:51 pm
Feb 062015
 

The next sing will take place on Thursday, March 5, at 7 pm.  NO experience is necessary. If you think this sounds interesting, we’d love to have you come listen and give it a try.  We will have several extra books to lend for the session.  If you’ve sung shape-note songs in the past and are ready for more singing close to home, we’re eager to meet you and have you join us, too.  If you want directions, please email ecsandberg@gmail.com.

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:50 pm
Feb 062015
 
Jacqueline and Dudley photo by Ken Williams

Jacqueline and Dudley
photo by Ken Williams

The Monadnock Center for History and Culture has received a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council to present “Contra Dancing in New Hampshire — Then and Now” by Dudley Laufman on Saturday, March 14th at 10:00 AM, in Bass Hall at 19 Grove Street in Peterborough, NH.

This program is free and open to the public.

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Presenter Dudley Laufman received the highest honor for traditional artists, the National Heritage Fellowship, in 2009. He received the 2001 NH Governor’s Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 1999, Laufman and Jacqueline Laufman presented at the Smithsonian FolkLife Festival in Washington, DC. Laufman has been playing fiddle and calling for contra and square dances for 64 years. With his wife, Jacqueline Laufman, he authored Traditional Barn Dances and recorded several CDs.

The presentation is part of the exhibit running through May at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture, titled “Gents Bow, Ladies Know How: Traditional Dance and Music in the Monadnock Region 1750-2015.” The exhibit traces the long history of traditional dance and music in southwestern New Hampshire from Colonial times to the present.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council nurtures the joy of learning and inspires community engagement by bringing life-enhancing ideas from the humanities to the people of New Hampshire. They connect people with ideas. Learn more about the Council and its work at www.nhhc.org.

For more information call 603-924-3235 or visit www.MonadnockCenter.org.

NH Humanities Council Logo

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:38 pm
Jan 192015
 

Randy Miller, Photo by Joseph Andruskevich

Randy Miller, Photo by Joseph Andruskevich

The Monadnock Center for History and Culture and the Monadnock Folklore Society present Randy Miller speaking on the topic of “The Music of John Taggart” on Saturday, February 7th at 5:30 PM, in Bass Hall at 19 Grove Street in Peterborough, NH.

The talk is based on “Recollection of a Busy Life, the memoir of John Adams Taggart (1854–1943).” In it, Taggart portrays in rich detail his childhood, his family’s way of life, and many of their neighbors in the town of Sharon, New Hampshire.

He was the fifth generation Taggart to reside in Sharon. His father, Phineas Taggart (1812–1892) was a fiddler and dancing master in the 1830s and ’40s, teaching in all the surrounding towns.

Presenter Randy Miller is a fiddler and artist based in Alstead, NH. His music book, “The New England Fiddler’s Repertoire,” written with Jack Perron, is considered the best contemporary collection of New England fiddle tunes.

The presentation is part of the exhibit running through May at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture, titled “Gents Bow, Ladies Know How: Traditional Dance and Music in the Monadnock Region 1750-2015.” The exhibit traces the long history of traditional dance and music in southwestern New Hampshire from Colonial times to the present.

The exhibit is sponsored by The Animal Care Clinic-Monadnock, with grant funding from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts.

For more information call 603-924-3235 or visit www.MonadnockCenter.org.

The Monadnock Center for History and Culture is a community museum that has been dedicated to preserving and celebrating local history and culture since its founding in 1902. The Monadnock Folklore Society was founded in 1980 to increase the visibility of folk dance and music events in southern New Hampshire and provide educational services in the folk arts to the community. The Country Dance and Song Society is a national leader in promoting participatory dance, music and song that have roots in English and North American culture and their living traditions.

 Posted by on January 19, 2015 at 5:18 pm
Jan 192015
 

The Monadnock Folklore Society presents the third in its series of English Country Dances with the theme “Dance Around Monadnock.”

On March 15h from 2:00 to 5:00 PM, the dance will be held at Bass Hall in the Monadnock Center for History and Culture in Peterborough, NH, with Brad Foster teaching dances that will appeal to all, from novice to experienced dancers.

Lovely music will be provided by performers Peter Barnes, piano and lydia ievins, violin.

English Country Dance is a form of social dance that harkens back to the days of Jane Austen and “Pride and Prejudice”, but its roots extend further back in time. Its traditions and innovations continue right up to the present.

Hauntingly beautiful tunes, elegant yet simple steps, friendly people and beautiful surroundings combine to make an English Country Dance a pleasant and energizing experience. No special clothing is required, but comfortable clothes and shoes are recommended.

Beginners and singles are welcome and all dances are taught throughout the session. Admission is $10. For more information call (603) 209-3304

 Posted by on January 19, 2015 at 4:53 pm
Jan 192015
 

Family Dance

6:30 – 8:30 PM

Bass Hall at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture

19 Grove Street

Peterborough NH

Part of the “Gents Bow, Ladies Know How: Traditional Dance and Music of the Monadnock Region 1750-2015″ exhibit at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture

Amy Cann, Gordon Peery

 Posted by on January 19, 2015 at 4:40 pm