Dec 082007
 

This 20-minute podcast includes music from Sarah’s new recording Lathrop’s Waltz, and features Sarah talking about growing up in the Monadnock Region, her musical influences, and her support for young musicians.

Dec 082007
 

Lathrop’s Waltz is the title of a new release from flute and whistle-player Sarah Bauhan. Through each of her 4 albums (starting in 1991) Sarah’s efforts have evolved in breadth and sophistication, though it must be said that she set the bar quite high from the beginning. Lathrop's Waltz

One could be unfamiliar with Sarah’s music, or even this genre (New England/Scottish/Celtic) and yet still reap great pleasure from listening. The melodies range from haunting to delightful, and they are well served by the caliber and diversity of the musicians. I believe Sarah took a risk (albeit well-calculated) in having such variety. Some of the pieces are rendered in a more modern, fluid style (the piano and bass stylings of Kent Allyn tastefully reveal his jazz influences), while other pieces are more solidly New England, accompanied by the inevitable Bob McQuillen, who has also served as a mentor throughout Sarah’s career. Continue reading »

Dec 062007
 

The Horatio Colony House Museum is hosting the annual Holiday Open House. The first floor of the museum, including the Library, Parlor, Music Room and Dinging Room, will be festooned with traditional seasonal decorations giving an air of holidays from long ago.

To add whimsy for the children, images of animals from the museum’s collection will also be on display.

The Holiday Open House is scheduled for Friday evening, December 5th  from 7:00 to 8:30 PM.  The museum will be lit with candles for the Friday evening program.

Friday evening is also the tree lighting ceremony on Central Square so “join in the spirit of the season” and take in these two Holiday events.

The Holiday Open House will also be held on Saturday, December 6th  from 1:00 to 2:30 PM.

Admission is free and cookies and cider will be available.

Please park in Saint Bernard’s Church parking lot next to the museum.

The Horatio Colony House Museum is located at 199 Main Street in Keene, New Hampshire.  The museum, a stately 1806 Federal style house, was Horatio Colony’s family home for three generations.  This old-time New England home is filled with original family furnishings and fabulous collections, which offer a gracious view of a vanishing lifestyle of culture, refinement and travel.

For information call 603 352-0460.

 Posted by on December 6, 2007 at 9:54 pm
Dec 052007
 

The Horatio Colony House Museum is hosting the annual Holiday Open House. The first floor of the museum, including the Library, Parlor, Music Room and Dinging Room, will be festooned with traditional seasonal decorations giving an air of holidays from long ago.

To add whimsy for the children, images of animals from the museum’s collection will also be on display.
The Holiday Open House is scheduled for Friday evening, December 5th  from 7:00 to 8:30 PM.  The museum will be lit with candles for the Friday evening program.

Friday evening is also the tree lighting ceremony on Central Square so “join in the spirit of the season” and take in these two Holiday events.

The Holiday Open House will also be held on Saturday, December 6th  from 1:00 to 2:30 PM.

Admission is free and cookies and cider will be available.
Please park in Saint Bernard’s Church parking lot next to the museum.
The Horatio Colony House Museum is located at 199 Main Street in Keene, New Hampshire.  The museum, a stately 1806 Federal style house, was Horatio Colony’s family home for three generations.  This old-time New England home is filled with original family furnishings and fabulous collections, which offer a gracious view of a vanishing lifestyle of culture, refinement and travel.
For information call 603 352-0460.

 Posted by on December 5, 2007 at 9:53 pm
Dec 052007
 

Dublin Community Church, Dublin, NH

$15 / $12 (seniors, youth)
(advance reservations not available day of concert)

This will be the thirty-fourth touring season of Nowell Sing We Clear with its unusual songs, carols, stories, and customs. Drawn mostly from English-language folk traditions, the songs tell both a version of the events and characters involved in the Christmas story and detail the customs which make up the twelve magical days following the return of the light at the winter solstice. Many of these ancient customs are the basis of the today’s holiday traditions, such as visiting and feasting, gift-giving, carol singing from door-to-door and the adorning of houses and churches with garlands of evergreen.

Nowell Sing We Clear celebrates Christmas as it was known for centuries in Britain and North America and as it continues in many places to the present.  The songs come from an age when the midwinter season was a time for joyous celebration and vigorous expression of older, perhaps pagan, religious ideas. There is not always a clear line between these and the rejoicing at the birth of Jesus bringing a fresh light into the world at this dark midwinter time. A special and unusual treat is the enactment of a Mummers Play from Kentucky.  Performed in the traditional manner, the play is typical of folk dramas which survive to this day throughout Britain and North America symbolizing and portraying the death of the land at midwinter and its subsequent rebirth in the spring.

While much of the singing is done in unaccompanied style, the pageant is also stamped with the energetic dance band sound of fiddle, button accordion, electric piano, drums, and concertina.  The audience will be supplied with songsheets and encouraged to sing along, though after three decades of touring in New England, a whole generation of young people have grown up with these songs and carols and sing along with as much as they can. Some “new”,that is “different”, songs and carols are introduced every year.  Performers are John Roberts and Tony Barrand, widely known for their lively presentations of English folk songs, and Fred Breunig and Andy Davis, well known in New England as dance callers and musicians.

Nowell Sing We Clear has become a regular part of some communities on the Eastern seaboard.  The group has several recordings of songs from the show which have been popular items in many households at this time of year. Their CDs are drawn from songs learned for their concerts: The newest is Just Say Nowell, Hail Smiling Morn has a cover designed by famous Vermont artist, Mary Azarian, and Nowell SingWe Four.The first three LP recordings are all well represented on a compact disk, The Best of Nowell: 1976 – 1985 All recordings are available from Golden Hind Records.

 Posted by on December 5, 2007 at 1:17 pm
Dec 012007
 

Musical genres are funny things. I remember in the early days of the Folkway Coffeehouse in Peterborough, there was a rule that no amplified instruments could be used. This was put to the test when Stan Rogers showed up for a triumphant return to the venue (he was an unknown when he first performed there), with an electric bassist to accompany him. There was much hemming and hawing, but of course Stan went on, and everything worked out fine. This was a little mini-version of the crisis Bob Dylan had instigated some years before when he electrified Newport. Sadly, Stan didn’t live long enough for us to find out where his musical explorations might have taken him. Dylan, on the other hand, is making commercials for Cadillac and Victoria’s Secret. He still makes great music, and while it is informed by multiple genres. I think you’d still have to use the word “folk” among them. Continue reading »