Mar 112009
 

DelRossi’s Trattoria

Irish Session, Pub Picking Party
All acoustic musicians welcome to join us in a traditional foot-stompin’ fiddling jam session. Or just come to enjoy the music.

FREE!

Rt. 137N
PO Box 337
Dublin NH 03444

Reservations,603-563-7195

Serving fine Italian cuisine featuring our own homemade pasta.
Wed.&Thurs., 5:00-8:00pm;  Fri.&Sat., 5:00-9:00pm;  Sunday 4:00-8:00pm.

Closed Monday & Tuesday.
delrossi4@myfairpoint.net

Mar 112009
 

DelRossi’s Trattoria

Local duo, Steve Jones & Tim Mowry performing stunning arrangements of Celtic instrumentals, on guitars, mandolin, Irish Bouzouki, & open-back banjo.

Donations

Rt. 137N
PO Box 337
Dublin NH 03444

Reservations,603-563-7195

Serving fine Italian cuisine featuring our own homemade pasta.
Wed.&Thurs., 5:00-8:00pm;  Fri.&Sat., 5:00-9:00pm;  Sunday 4:00-8:00pm.

Closed Monday & Tuesday.
delrossi4@myfairpoint.net

 Posted by on March 11, 2009 at 11:52 am
Mar 052009
 

Stonewall Farm, Keene NH

Advanced tickets, $17
At the door, $19

Arbo’s quirky ’90s string band, Salamander Crossing, helped blow the doors open for the neotrad revival. On a new album, “Big Old Life,” her current band captures the visceral and fun-loving sound of American roots music. Her lovely alto wears simultaneous shades of sass and grace, world-weariness and resilience. As the quartet promenades from gospel to swing, ballad to barn-burner, it shows how trad is, at heart, a social music. Every playful and profound note they play proves that these songs are only as old as the last time someone sang them. ~  Scott Alarik The Boston Globe, May 2007

“Arbo is a triple threat as a fiddler, songwriter, and possessor of a uniquely beautiful, malleable alto. The group’s playing is tight, with stylish, unexpected choices, and Anand Nayak is a marvel of stylistic versatility on lead guitar, with a rich resonant tone and soulful, imaginative fills. Big Old Life is brimming with grace, however defined.” ~Acoustic Guitar Magazine, January 2008

So, what’s a daisy mayhem?

Wicked grooves, sublime lead singing, great harmonies, sparkling original songs, and a deep repertoire that spans 200 years of American music. Four people who share an irresistible chemistry on stage. An unusually gleeful string band that celebrates both tradition and improvisation and that stumps the categorizers. (Are they an agnostic gospel band? A homeopathic bluegrass band? Are they crazy?). Worth seeing…

Advanced tickets, $17
At the door, $19

Food available for purchase provided by Armadillo’s Burritos

Beer and Wine for purchase from the Pub Restaurant and Caterers

ADVANCED TICKETS ON SALE NOW AT
Armadillo’s Burritos, Keene, NH
Turn It Up, Keene, NH
Toadstool Bookshop, Keene NH

Preorder tickets by sending a self addressed stamped envelope with the amount of tickets you need and a check in the correct amount to Orange Earth Productions, PO Box 243, Spofford NH 03462. Orders will be filled as we receive them. For information on any show or to be added to our e-mail list, please contact us…. orangeearth@ne.rr.com
All ages show
Dancing welcome and encouraged!
Become an Angel…
At every performance there will be ten (10) Angel seats reserved. Angel tickets are twice the cost of the ticket price with half going towards sponsorship of the show. Angel seats are reserved seats in the first two rows. Angels will be thanked as a group prior to the show.
Check out our upcoming shows at orangeearthproductions.com
Thanks to our sponsors:
Santosha, True North Networks, Innovative Machine, Inc, Gem Graphics, Radio Rek, EF Lane

 Posted by on March 5, 2009 at 7:48 am
Mar 032009
 

Tom Smith will perform folk songs deeply rooted in the very best of old-school folk tradition.  His program includes traditional New England folk songs, accompanied by guitar, banjo, harmonica and other instruments. Suitable for all ages, Tom will introduce his songs, which in themselves paint a picture of the lives and times of old New England, with additional entertaining background and stories from his four decades of presenting folk music programs for family shows, coffeehouses, folk festivals, and schools.

Mariposa Museum & World Culture Center
26 Main Street
Peterborough, NH  03458

603-924-4555
pr@mariposamuseum.org

 Posted by on March 3, 2009 at 8:10 pm
Mar 032009
 

Benefit Concert
All proceeds to benefit the Mountain Shadows History Tours

Featured Artists
Mostly Folk with Judy Fine, Danny Solomon and Kenny Hamshaw

Doug Farrell

Judy Blake with Danny Solomon and Kenny Hamshaw

Eric Blackmer

Dinosaur Language with Ethan McBrien, Jordan Cusano and
Elyse Williams

Tickets in Advance:
Adults 10.00
Students 5.00
Advanced tickets may be bought at Steele’s, the Dublin General Store or by calling 827-3405.

Tickets at the Door:
Adults 15.00
Students 10.00

 Posted by on March 3, 2009 at 8:52 am
Mar 022009
 

My maternal grandparents lived their entire lives within a mile of where they both were born,  in West Wareham, Massachusetts, donkentjust before you get to Cape Cod. My grandfather was a cranberry farmer, so he had a professional as well as general interest in the weather. From early childhood visits, to my teenage years when I lived with them during the summer, I remember every morning the presence of Don Kent, WBZ’s weatherman, penetrating the living room. Don was the first radio and television meteorologist in Boston, with a career that began in the mid nineteen thirties, until his official retirement in the mid eighties.  Concepts like warm front, cold front, and even the jet stream had not been discovered when he started out. His own skills were based less on education and more on intuition and powers of observation. While serving in the Coast Guard in WWII, he had a lucky break when he foresaw the possibility of freezing rain occurring when practice flights were being made in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. He wasn’t influential enough to persuade the Navy to cancel their flight plans, but his own Coast Guard folks trusted his judgment and kept their planes on the ground. As it turned out, several of the Navy planes iced up and went into the ocean off of Cape Cod. His forecast, and the credibility he had earned, saved several lives that day. The war facilitated a significant advancement in the science of weather, and it’s been growing in leaps and bounds ever since.

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