Aug 292009
 

John Doyle, who played the most amazing set of music at last year’s New World Fest with our late good friend Jerry Holland, is also very well known and loved for his singing and solo guitar work.   He will be performing a solo house concert at Beth Telford’s home on Sept 5th at 7 pm.  As usual, we invite all to bring desserts and beverages to share at intermission.  Seats are $17 in advance/ $20 day of show.  To reserve a seat, make the check out to John Doyle, and mail to Beth Telford 1060 Bent Hill Rd, Braintree, VT 05060.  For more information, call Beth or Clint at 802-728-6351.

 Posted by on August 29, 2009 at 11:07 am
Aug 262009
 

Dancing Noon to Midnight!

Admission $22

Peterborough Town House
(corner of Grove and Main)

Callers include:

Peter Amidon
David Kaynor
Steve Zakon-Anderson

Bands include:
Heathen Creek
George Wilson, Selma Kaplan and Alan Bradbury
KGB (from Seattle)
Gotham Pioneers:  Lise Brown, Naomi Morse, Peter Siegel, Owen Marshall

 Posted by on August 26, 2009 at 11:18 am
Aug 242009
 

The Brattleboro Labor Day Dawn Dance will take place on Sunday September 6th, 2009 at the Gibson Aiken Center on Main Street in Brattleboro, VT.  The dance begins with English dancing from 2:30 to 5:30 PM with Robert Moir calling, Daron Douglas on fiddle, Shira Kammen on violin, and Karen Axelrod on piano.  The contra dance segment begins at 8:00 PM and ends at 7:00 AM, and features three bands and three callers including Lisa Greenleaf with Crowfoot, Sue Rosen with Phantom Power, and George Marshall with Magic Foot. Tickets are $10 for English, $20 for contra, and $25 for both ($7/$15/$22 for students and seniors), and can be purchased online at www.dawndance.org, at Maple Leaf Music in Brattleboro, or at the door the day of the dance.

 Posted by on August 24, 2009 at 10:21 am
Aug 112009
 

with special guest JAZZOU JONES (aka Tom Jones, brother of our own Steve Jones).

Admission $10

Dave and Cathy have spent decades researching the roots music traditions and folklife of Missouri and the Ozarks and, in the mid-90’s, produced two landmark recordings of songs from the Civil War.

Their performances offer a wide variety of music from lively dance tunes to old ballads with “period” instruments such as “bones”, “mouthbow”, & “leaf”(?), as well as dulcimers, banjo and guitar.

Not only an accomplished dulcimer player, Cathy is also a master of the frailing 5-string banjo style and a two-time winner of the Tennessee Old Time Banjo Championship.

Together with Dave’s distinctive folk guitar back up, their shows are a professional commemorative of a by-gone time in music history.

Longtime friend Tom (jazzou) Jones, whose lifetime piano career spans jazz clubs to ragtime riverboat,  joins them on a few special tunes.

DelRossi’s Trattoria, Rt. 137N  PO Box 337, Dublin NH 03444; Reservations,603-563-7195
David & Elaina DelRossi, prop. since 1989, celebrating 20 years!
Serving fine Italian cuisine, featuring our own homemade pasta.
Lunch, Tues. – Fri. 12-2;        Dinner, Tues.- Thurs. 5-8:30; Fri. & Sat. 5-9; Sun. 4-8        Closed Mon.

 Posted by on August 11, 2009 at 11:17 am
Aug 112009
 

Fingerpicking guitar instrumentals
6:30-8:00pm, to compliment your dining experience, live background guitar music from Classical to Ragtime to comtemporary. Donations appreciated.

A graduate of New England Conservatory of Music and a very talented multi-instrumentalist, please check out Mike’s web site.

8:00pm, Mike switches to fiddle and kicks off an old-timey fiddlin’ pickin’ party. Open to the public; all acoustic musicians welcome to join us for some foot-stompin’ fun.

DelRossi’s Trattoria, Rt. 137N  PO Box 337, Dublin NH 03444; Reservations,603-563-7195
David & Elaina DelRossi, prop. since 1989, celebrating 20 years!
Serving fine Italian cuisine, featuring our own homemade pasta.
Lunch, Tues. – Fri. 12-2;        Dinner, Tues.- Thurs. 5-8:30; Fri. & Sat. 5-9; Sun. 4-8        Closed Mon.

 Posted by on August 11, 2009 at 11:15 am
Aug 052009
 

In many respects, August is a month without a holiday, or at least a day of generally recognized significance, in our culture. Some months the holidays are global: the solstices in December and June, with the former being linked with the more high-profile Christmas. Others are specific to our country, such as Thanksgiving, Memorial Day, and the Fourth of July. But once that first week of July is over there is not much noteworthy until we (or at least some folks) get to have a day off from work on, of all things, Labor Day.

Of course, people do seek causes for celebration and acknowledgement of more targeted interests. For what it’s worth, August is National Catfish Month, which might be particularly exciting to traditional musicians who are playing Nail That Catfish to a Tree. This is clearly a Southern tune, but we New Englanders like to indulge ourselves once in a while.

The first Saturday of August bears the distinction of being National Mustard Day. This event is officially sponsored by Mt. Horeb (Wisconsin) Mustard Museum which we highly recommend, even though it is only remotely connected to folk traditions in the Monadnock Region.

If either the ingestion of mustard, or listening to the Catfish tune inspires some podiatric activity, August 6th is Wiggle Your Toes Day.

August happens to be the birth month of two national folk heroes, Annie Oakley, and Davy Crockett. But as far as we know, not too many people in these parts get too excited about this. What we do get excited about is community, and throughout the summer (July and August) towns throughout New Hampshire have their Old Home Weeks and Old Home Days. The tradition is to some degree unique to New Hampshire. The story begins with the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825. As word spread about the option of farming without rocks in the fertile midwest, folks began packing up and leaving New Hampshire towns. This emigration continued through the century. The Civil War saw many young men leave, and while many lost their lives in this conflict, others were enticed by places they had seen, and did not return.

Also during this time the railroad facilitated the temptation to escape the harsh New England lifestyle for the Midwest, and eventually sunny California. By the end of the century many small New Hampshire towns had practically disappeared, and Governor Frank Rollins asked the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture to support the concept of “reunions,” where those who had left would be encouraged to return and visit.

Today towns throughout New Hampshire and New England pull out all the stops to provide a week of special activities and celebrations.

Nelson (global headquarters for the Monadnock Folklore Society) will have its Old Home Week starting Sunday, August 9th. Visit the Town of Nelson web site for more details, but we do want to highlight the Nelson Folks Coffeehouse on Saturday, August 15th, at 7:00 PM at the Town Hall. This will feature a wide variety of Nelson-based performers, and of course it’s free. If you are interested in performing, please send us an email and we’ll connect with you on the details.

Just before Old Home Week officially launches, we are pleased to have Dudley and Jacqueline Laufman for the Nelson Second Saturday contra dance on August 8th. Dudley’s name is historically synonymous with contra dancing in Nelson. Older dancers will welcome the opportunity to hear him again, and younger dancers are encouraged to come and get introduced to this legendary figure. Dancing starts at 8:00, and thanks to a local benefactor, admission is only $2.