Oct 162009
 

Alyson’s Orchard, Walpole NH

Nils Fredland calls to music by Mary Lea and Stuart Kenney.

Family Dance 3:00

Adult Dance 5:00

Tickets $10 or $25 per family

Delectable desserts provided by Ann-Michele Andrews, Hearty Soups prepared by the Works Bakery Cafe, Bread from Orchard Hill Breadworks

Silent auction with many donated items

For more information: Sophia’s Hearth at 603-357-3755 or http://sophiashearth.org

All proceeds benefit Sophia’s Hearth Family Center

Oct 102009
 

The Youth Orchestra of the North Rhine Westfalia (JugendZupfOrchester Northrhine Westfalia), a virtuoso mandolin and guitar string orchestra will perform classical, jazz, and contemporary music at the Peterborough Town House on Wednesday evening, October 14 at 7:30 p.m. The concert ends at 8:45pm.

These accomplished young musicians of high school and college age are all winners of national music competitions. They are continuing an old tradition: the guitar/mandolin string orchestra, which was popular at the turn of the twentieth century across America and Europe. YONRW is the premier German youth orchestra in the guitar/mandolin format, and is supported by private sponsors and the German state of Westfalia. Also performing with the orchestra will be one of Europe’s greatest classical mandolin virtuosi, Annika Lueckenbergfeld, and international classical guitar contest winner Fabian Hinsche.

The concert will feature electric guitar, classical mandolin, small group jazz, and full-orchestra performances of classical, romantic and contemporary music. Featured will be the “Mandolin Club March,” composed by Peterborough High School principal Francis E. Mason in 1903, and re-orchestrated in 2009 by professor August Watters of the Berklee College of Music. The “Mandolin Club March” is a lively march in the style of John Philip Sousa. Professor Watters, who lives in Peterborough, will also perform with the orchestra.

Peterborough’s own mandolin orchestra tradition dates to the late 1800s, when the Peterborough Mandolin Club performed regularly. In 1903, the mandolin club sold copies of the “Mandolin Club March” to raise funds to buy a new piano for Peterborough High School.

Tickets are $10 for adults, and $5 for students, and are available in advance at the Toadstool Bookshops, or at the door. For more information contact 617-306-8055.

 Posted by on October 10, 2009 at 9:21 am
Oct 102009
 

Doors open 5pm
Show begins 6pm
All ages welcome

Seth Glier is a 20 year-old singer/songwriter/pianist
from Massachusetts swiftly making a name for himself
on the national scene. His debut album for MPress,
The Trouble With People, is both timeless and modern
and has drawn comparisons to Billy Joel, Marc Cohn,
Gavin DeGraw, Elton John and Paul McCartney.

Mexican Fare available until 5:45
Beverages, all evening

Reserved Seats For Sponsors and Angels Only

All Other Seats General Admission

Good Keene Music – Bringing Original Local and Regional Music to Downtown in an Intimate and Relaxing Setting
Thanks to our sponsors, True North Networks, Innovative Machine,Inc, Gem Graphics, Santosha, LLC and Radio Rek

Tickets available at:
Armadillos – Keene (603) 358-3700
Turn It Up – Keene (603) 358-6833
Toadstool Bookshop, Keene (603) 352-8815
Village Square Booksellers, Bellows Falls, VT (802) 463-9404

www.orangeearthproductions.com

orangeearth@ne.rr.com
PO Box 243
Spofford, NH

 Posted by on October 10, 2009 at 9:10 am
Oct 062009
 

itunesIn the last Folknotes we talked about the popularity of folk music in the early 1960’s. We noted the fact that the British invasion of rock and roll marked the beginning of a decline in this popularity, and cited a recent Pew Research Center survey that didn’t even include folk as a category.

Shortly after we wrote this article Mary Traverse died, and even mainstream media published stories about how Peter, Paul and Mary had been instrumental (as well as vocal) in making folk music more popular, and most articles also referenced the subsequent decline.

Also, at just about this time, I downloaded the most recent version of iTunes, and was surprised to see that on iTunes radio, “Folk” was no longer offered as a category. I was eventually able to find my favorite station, WUMB, listed under college radio, but I got the message: Apple (a very innovative trend-setter) no longer considered folk music to be significant enough to have a place of its own. Continue reading »