Dec 272011
 




The Monadnock Folklore Society is excited to present home-town boy Jeff Murphy and his band, ‘Wooden Dinosaur’, to celebrate the release of their new CD ‘Spaces’ at the Nelson Town Hall on Friday February 10 at 8:00 PM. Admission is $12/$9 (Sr/Jr)

“Wooden Dinosaur makes the kind of simple, stripped-down music that leaves you feeling nostalgic and longing for more.”
NPR’s All Songs Considered

Wooden Dinosaur is an original six-piece folk ensemble with members from throughout New England. The band makes music that is deeply American, yet forward thinking. Built around the songs of Brattleboro-based guitarist Michael Roberts, Wooden Dinosaur uses a diverse array of instruments – fiddle, upright bass, drums, trumpet and euphonium – in its tasteful arrangements of original material. Though “indie-folk” is the label most often applied to this music, alt-country, blues, old time, and jazz influences are woven into the band’s signature sound.

Wooden Dinosaur’s debut album, Nearly Lost Stars (2010), garnered both regional and national attention, and cemented the band’s reputation as a fresh voice in the New England Americana scene. Since then the group has toured throughout the Northeast and shared the stage with some of the country’s most exciting new acts, including The Devil Makes Three, Brown Bird, The Low Anthem, Joe Pug, Rusty Belle and David Wax Museum.

The band spent 2011 working on their second full-length album, Spaces. Much of the recording for the new album took place at a house in Nelson, over July 4th weekend. Recorded in between family-style BBQ’s and trips to the local swimming hole, the album reflects the group’s dedication to a diverse array of American musical traditions.

Opening the show will be Dollar General, the new project from Vermont composer and guitarist Michael Chorney. This folk-jazz group features the rhythm section from Anais Mitchell’s acclaimed Hadestown Orchestra, along with pedal steel player Asa Brosius. The band plays Chorney’s original songs, which show jazz, country and folk influences, and reflect Chorney’s unique approach to the craft of songwriting.

 Posted by on December 27, 2011 at 2:50 pm
Dec 182011
 

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Contra Dance at the Stone Church
Main and Grove Streets, Brattleboro, VT

February 26, 2012
Tavi Merrill, calling/fiddle
Rachel Panitch, fiddle
Rebecca Bosworth-Clemens, clarinet
Amy Englesberg, piano

7:30 – 10:30 (beginners lesson 7:15)
$10 / $7 students, seniors, low income

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Brattleboro Dance Schedule
(more info at http://www.brattcontra.org or 802-257-9234)

Dec 182011
 

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Contra Dance at the Stone Church
Main and Grove Streets, Brattleboro, VT

February 12, 2012
Quena Crain, calling
Louisa Pugh, fiddle
Mike Harrist, bass
Barron Collins-Hills, mandolin

7:30 – 10:30 (beginners lesson 7:15)
$10 / $7 students, seniors, low income

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Brattleboro Dance Schedule
(more info at http://www.brattcontra.org or 802-257-9234)

Dec 182011
 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Contra Dance at the Stone Church
Main and Grove Streets, Brattleboro, VT

January 22, 2012
A special evening of Square Dancing and old time music!
Nils Fredland, calling
Mia Friedman, fiddle
Jeff Lewis, mandolin
Owen Marshall, guitar
Corey DiMario, bass

7:30 – 10:30 (beginners lesson 7:15)
$10 / $7 students, seniors, low income

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Brattleboro Dance Schedule
(more info at http://www.brattcontra.org or 802-257-9234)

Dec 182011
 

How To Write A Mummers Play
By Allison Aldrich
December 2011

‘Twas a month before Solstice, and all through my head
Ran a host of ideas and thoughts, so instead
Of paying my bills or attending to mail,
I spent every day on the Web, without fail
Trolling for news items, searching for memes-
Soon it was haunting my thoughts and my dreams.
Oh, no! it’s December! And I haven’t written
A line or a phrase- I must have been smitten
With rushes of blood to my head to agree
To write this ridiculous annual spree.
But now they are asking, “So, how is it going?”
“Just great!” I assure them, sincerity flowing.
In fact, I’ve a plot in my head that might work,
And yes! Just in time, there’s an obvious jerk
In the news, who is perfect for playing the Fool,
And the maiden is there, but the hero’s in school
And can’t be consulted. The Dragon could be
Any number of nasties that daily we see
On the news, on the streets, but whichever I choose,
You can bet that the week of the show there’ll be news
Of an impending threat or a star on a bend,
Who should be included, but now to attend
To rehearsals, and costumes, and last-minute changes-
The rhymes don’t quite scan, Father Christmas arranges
A family party the day of the show!
The Fair Maiden’s costume’s revealing to show
What must not be shown- can we get underway
And perform a complete and acceptable play
That has humor and context and couplets that rhyme,
And scan the right rhythm, for most of the time?
Will the audience laugh? Will the swords ever lock?
Will the hero lie there with a hole in his sock?
Yes , they will, yes we can, yes we did, it was fun!
And now I can file this son-of-a-gun!
Will I do it again? Oh, I will if they ask,
Despite all the worries that come with the task.
And now to relax, celebrate with good cheer!
I wish you good Solstice, and happy New Year!

 Posted by on December 18, 2011 at 12:57 pm
Dec 042011
 

The Keene Public Library hosts a monthly free family dance for children and adults of all ages and abilities.

The dance runs from 6:30 – 8:30 PM and admission is FREE.

Family Dances started at the Keene Public Library in the summer of 2003. Now the dances are held the first Friday of each month from November through May. Over the years, the series has become an important library program that helps to develop early literacy skills and is fun too. Folk dancing helps to encourage the basic concepts of rhythm, repetition, sequencing, patterning, predictability, anticipation, musical cues, auditory discrimination, and counting. These are all important early learning skills. Traditional dance also is a great way to introduce children to the world’s rich diversity, to teach the enjoyment of dance, music, and rhythm and to begin a livelong habit of the social enjoyment and physical activity of dancing.

Dec 042011
 

The Keene Public Library hosts a monthly free family dance for children and adults of all ages and abilities.

The dance runs from 6:30 – 8:30 PM and admission is FREE. Nils Fredland will teach and call the dances.

Family Dances started at the Keene Public Library in the summer of 2003. Now the dances are held the first Friday of each month from November through May. Over the years, the series has become an important library program that helps to develop early literacy skills and is fun too. Folk dancing helps to encourage the basic concepts of rhythm, repetition, sequencing, patterning, predictability, anticipation, musical cues, auditory discrimination, and counting. These are all important early learning skills. Traditional dance also is a great way to introduce children to the world’s rich diversity, to teach the enjoyment of dance, music, and rhythm and to begin a livelong habit of the social enjoyment and physical activity of dancing.

Dec 042011
 

The Keene Public Library hosts a monthly free family dance for children and adults of all ages and abilities.

The dance runs from 6:30 – 8:30 PM and admission is FREE. Allison Aldrich and Hunt Smith will provide music and calls – http://huntandallison.net/

Family Dances started at the Keene Public Library in the summer of 2003. Now the dances are held the first Friday of each month from November through May. Over the years, the series has become an important library program that helps to develop early literacy skills and is fun too. Folk dancing helps to encourage the basic concepts of rhythm, repetition, sequencing, patterning, predictability, anticipation, musical cues, auditory discrimination, and counting. These are all important early learning skills. Traditional dance also is a great way to introduce children to the world’s rich diversity, to teach the enjoyment of dance, music, and rhythm and to begin a livelong habit of the social enjoyment and physical activity of dancing.

Dec 042011
 

The Keene Public Library hosts a monthly free family dance for children and adults of all ages and abilities.

The dance runs from 6:30 – 8:30 PM and admission is FREE. Lisa Sieverts will teach and call dances to music by Rodney Miller and Gordon Peery.

Family Dances started at the Keene Public Library in the summer of 2003. Now the dances are held the first Friday of each month from November through May. Over the years, the series has become an important library program that helps to develop early literacy skills and is fun too. Folk dancing helps to encourage the basic concepts of rhythm, repetition, sequencing, patterning, predictability, anticipation, musical cues, auditory discrimination, and counting. These are all important early learning skills. Traditional dance also is a great way to introduce children to the world’s rich diversity, to teach the enjoyment of dance, music, and rhythm and to begin a livelong habit of the social enjoyment and physical activity of dancing.

Dec 042011
 

The Keene Public Library hosts a monthly free family dance for children and adults of all ages and abilities.

The dance runs from 6:30 – 8:30 PM and admission is FREE. Mary DesRosiers will teach and call the dances.

Family Dances started at the Keene Public Library in the summer of 2003. Now the dances are held the first Friday of each month from November through May. Over the years, the series has become an important library program that helps to develop early literacy skills and is fun too. Folk dancing helps to encourage the basic concepts of rhythm, repetition, sequencing, patterning, predictability, anticipation, musical cues, auditory discrimination, and counting. These are all important early learning skills. Traditional dance also is a great way to introduce children to the world’s rich diversity, to teach the enjoyment of dance, music, and rhythm and to begin a livelong habit of the social enjoyment and physical activity of dancing.