Feb 082015
 

shortsister1

 

Fay Baird, Kate Seeger, and Kim Wallach…

have been singing and performing together since 1979. They return to the Nelson Town Hall on Sunday, March 15 for a 7:00 PM concert. Admission is $12/$9(Sr/Jr/Advance).

Though they are not really sisters, and not particularly short, they do sound like sisters and share a delight in harmony. The songs chosen by the trio tell stories and paint pictures, conveying strong visual images through music. They favor acapella arrangements but also accompany themselves with guitar, autoharp and banjo.

The Short Sisters challenge the audience’s imagination and invite their participation with compelling words, powerful melodies and elegant arrangements. Audiences comment on more than just the trio’s extraordinary harmonies and choice of material. Their playfulness and pleasure in each other’s company leave listeners energized and cheered. Their repertoire includes intricate rounds, songs from American, African-American and British traditions and material from contemporary songwriters. The Short Sisters’ favorite songs, funny or moving, thought-provoking or frivolous, traditional or newly written, convey optimism about tackling life’s challenges.

The trio’s performance list covers Folksong Societies and Coffeehouses in their home states of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Florida, forays to Michigan and California, and regular appearances in New Jersey, New England and Washington D.C. They have recorded five albums, four of which are available on CD.

Songs both traditional and new: unusual rounds, musical curiosities and chorus songs, Sacred Harp songs, ballads and much more. Whether acapella or with guitar, autoharp and banjo, the Short Sisters blend their voices in stunning and original harmonies.

 Posted by on February 8, 2015 at 1:50 pm
Feb 062015
 

The next sing will take place on Thursday, March 19, at 7 pm.  NO experience is necessary. If you think this sounds interesting, we’d love to have you come listen and give it a try.  We will have several extra books to lend for the session.  If you’ve sung shape-note songs in the past and are ready for more singing close to home, we’re eager to meet you and have you join us, too.  If you want directions, please email ecsandberg@gmail.com.

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:51 pm
Feb 062015
 

The next sing will take place on Thursday, March 5, at 7 pm.  NO experience is necessary. If you think this sounds interesting, we’d love to have you come listen and give it a try.  We will have several extra books to lend for the session.  If you’ve sung shape-note songs in the past and are ready for more singing close to home, we’re eager to meet you and have you join us, too.  If you want directions, please email ecsandberg@gmail.com.

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:50 pm
Feb 062015
 
Jacqueline and Dudley photo by Ken Williams

Jacqueline and Dudley
photo by Ken Williams

The Monadnock Center for History and Culture has received a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council to present “Contra Dancing in New Hampshire — Then and Now” by Dudley Laufman on Saturday, March 14th at 10:00 AM, in Bass Hall at 19 Grove Street in Peterborough, NH.

This program is free and open to the public.

Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon.

Presenter Dudley Laufman received the highest honor for traditional artists, the National Heritage Fellowship, in 2009. He received the 2001 NH Governor’s Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 1999, Laufman and Jacqueline Laufman presented at the Smithsonian FolkLife Festival in Washington, DC. Laufman has been playing fiddle and calling for contra and square dances for 64 years. With his wife, Jacqueline Laufman, he authored Traditional Barn Dances and recorded several CDs.

The presentation is part of the exhibit running through May at the Monadnock Center for History and Culture, titled “Gents Bow, Ladies Know How: Traditional Dance and Music in the Monadnock Region 1750-2015.” The exhibit traces the long history of traditional dance and music in southwestern New Hampshire from Colonial times to the present.

The New Hampshire Humanities Council nurtures the joy of learning and inspires community engagement by bringing life-enhancing ideas from the humanities to the people of New Hampshire. They connect people with ideas. Learn more about the Council and its work at www.nhhc.org.

For more information call 603-924-3235 or visit www.MonadnockCenter.org.

NH Humanities Council Logo

 Posted by on February 6, 2015 at 8:38 pm